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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)
, drones can be more useful in that kind of environment. our allies seem to want to take the lead. but we're going to have to be much more supportive than we're now willing to be in that area. and we're going to have to think hard about other places like syria. >> right. >> where there's, you know, a massive loss of life, 60,000 already. and we're hanging back there. again, i think out of reluctance to get too involved because of the slippery slope that in the end will have to be militarily involved and the people and the president have better things to do. >> a piece in "the wall street journal" this week saying basically there's too much reaction to iraq and inaction here he compares to the first president bush not doing anything about the shiite uprising in iraq in 1991, which he argued led ultimately to the second gulf war. i think that may be an area where people would debate, but what are the consequences of the u.s. hanging back in syria? >> well, if we hang back in syria, there could be a dissent into chaos. it's already headed in that direction. again, the rise of these islamic j
in high threat environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenge for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of state, you have changed the face of america abroad, and extended the house killed the bill -- ho
the president's proposals in some is cases but work to make them better in others. >>> bad for the environment or good for job creation? the fate of the controversial keystone pipeline rests with the administration now. i will talk about that with a republican senator from idaho. plus, a reality show of a very different kind. >> women are petrified and ashamed and scared that their secret will come out. >> a new christian series follows five women struggling with grief and guilt. fox's lauren green tells us why, after the break. [ male announcer ] with over 50 delicious choices of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant >> shannon: it is a first for reality television. a christian show that follows several women after their decision to have an abortion. lauren green has more. >> women are petrified and ashamed and scared that their secret will come out. >> but you here they will surrender the secret. it is the name of the first ever reality show about women in a bible study trying to recover from the built they feel
kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> developments kicking off our top social media news of the day. the bbc tweeting just moments ago, north korea says it plans to carry out nuclear tests and more long range rocket launches, quote, aimed at the u.s. that doesn't sound like good news, does it? also today the associated press tweeting about secretary of state hillary clinton. congressmen joked with hillary clinton about a 2016 presidential bid. yes, secretary clinton's possible run was the elephant in the room during today's benghazi hearings, and the comment getting a laugh from secretary clinton. >> thank you, mr. chairman. madam secretary, let me first thank you for your service and i wish you the best in your future endeavors, mostly. (laughter) >> and taking aim at lance armstrong, tweeting that lance armstrong-inspi
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> more with senator marco rubio. and house nearly three months to raise the debt ceiling. >> look, i understand why they want to move the initiative forward and i think there is some strategicty to the way they're doing it it and i believe the second part the of it it, congress shouldn't get paid unless a budget is passed. no one wants to miss a paycheck certainly, but i think it's a very valid point and i think that it's not unfair to say to the people if you're not going to do your job, you shouldn't get paid. >> greta: and we keep getting these, like goal posts and mile posts and three more months. >> absolutely. >> greta: six more months and another excuse-- >> in fairness, i think it's the house. if they believed they could pass a bill out of house that not only dealt with the debt limit, but with our debt proble
area, have appreciated the goals of our environment and climate change and doing everything that we can. i think the 80%, we're not going to be satisfied with that, spencer. we want 100% zero waste. this is where we're going. >> reporter: is that possible? >> i think it is. it is possible. >> reporter: san francisco residents sven eberlein and debra baida think it's possible, too. they are avid recyclers and composters, so much so that they produce almost no trash. baida lists what goes into the compost bin. >> we put wrappers from our butter, we put any meat or package, that kind of packaged paper food, soiled food wrappings, tissues, q-tips, paper napkins, which we don't have in our home. if those come in, those go there. soiled paper plates, milk cartons. >> i go to travel somewhere, and i'm, you know, i have, like, an apple and "where's the compost?" you know, and i have to throw it in the trash, and it kind of, you know, it just doesn't feel quite right, you know. >> reporter: but not all san franciscans are as enthusiastic as eberlein and baida. those who refuse to sort their garb
from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, our security at home is threatened. >> i thought that was such -- that's hillary clinton testifying this week and i thought that line was so important because it kind of disstills down i think the operational theory in intervention here or american leadership, which is when america is absent, especially from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, security at home is threatened. horace, that seems like a proposition you don't agree with and libya was a failed implementation of that view. >> first of all, hillary clinton has a very short memory, so the kind of leadership she's talking about, we have to be very clear, what kind of leadership we want in africa. the people in africa want peace. they want unity and they want reconstruction. they do not want wars. and what happened in libya is a sign of the kind of militarism we've seen all over africa from the u.s. africa command. 50,000 libyans have been killed out of this intervention. the w
to a changing political environment." >> first of all, on that comment, it is deeply offensive. democrats did the same thing in 2008. i believe andrew cuomo may have said the same thing in 2008, and he was -- >> got a pass. >> yeah. he was not hammered as much. >> he got hammered for that? i read that someone got a pass for it. >> some have gotten a pass. anyway, i think cuomo got hammered pretty hard. but this is -- i saw, richard haass, mr. i'm not going to speculate on anything that's not in front of my nose, you know, this is important. this is an important story because the guy who has been the de facto leader of the republican party over the past four years since george w. bush left town is roger els. he's run the party, he's run the conservative movement. when roger els decides she's not worth the trouble, then that means that conservatism's moving in a new direction. i talked about what happened this weekend at "the national review" institute's talk. i was really surprised. really surprised by what i heard. and heartened, whether it was bill kristol or john hatoritz. also scott walker
much war today. the kind of environment in afghanistan, for example where iad's . there is shell rockets and terrorist attacks by suicide bombers and others. but having said that. i believe that the important factor here is that women and men in order to qualify for certain role military have to meet mental and physical standarpeds . as long as that standard is adhered to, i am proud to have qualified women who are serving in combat situations and you know, some people i know think that generally speaking women are smarter than men anyway. >> i can second that definitely. wrapping up quickly. i know you are planing to make news focusing on immigration on monday. can you give insight as to what it is about in >> a group much us have worked for a number of weeks on immigration reform. we'll articulate those principles and we want to work with the white house and house. but bipartisan group of senators will be coming up with a set of the principles. it is very important that we act in coordination with the white house rather than in opposition and with our house colleagues. i believ
there which puts a burden on the small unit combat leaders, and actually creates an environment because of their living conditions that is not conducive to readiness. others claim women suffer more than men and that pregnancy is an issue. to senator john mccain it's really a question of equal standards for certain demanding jobs. >> i think women obviously are prepared to serve side by side with men in combat. i just want to emphasize though there shouldn't be the same physical and mental standards for anyone to perform certain roles and functions in the military many women say it's just a question of equal rights since serving in combat allows the soldiers to advance through the ranks farther and faster. >> we need to treat people like individuals. what are the capabilities they bring to the fight, which includes physical strengths, plus courage, plus aptitude, plus leadership and all the other things we need to have the most effective fighting force. >> military chiefs now until may 15th to make their case to the defense secretary about which jobs if any should still exclude women, he
asked was it was inspiring to a lot of people. i asked if he felt like four years later the environment in washington seems more nasty than ever had he been able to usher that in, and one of the two reasons that he felt like it had been a challenge was of the media. i think the larger point that he was trying to make was that the media is becoming increasingly skewed over the past few years. we toned listen to the people we agree with, rather than the people that we disagree with, which makes it more difficult to find common ground in a place like washington. >> he did say it's one of the practices by his guest, but that doesn't mean that we need assault weapons is basically his point, i guess. >> yeah. well, i mean, frank, the editor of the new republic asked him point blairnk have you ever fired a gun, and he said, yeah, we go skeet shooting all the time up at camp david. he and his guests, which was news to us and news to a lot of people. i think he did seem very intent on trying to bridge the divide between gun owners and those that don't. it was a telling sign that he says he is a
an environment that the president of the united states feels comfortable coming on their network without any concern he might be challenged and therefore look bad or stupid. atlantic panned the interview calling it embarrassing failure is that uncovered no new information, arguing the daily show's jon steb wart asks tougher questions. "there is something deeply wrong with american journalism when the host of a half-hour comedy show with a left-leaning audience easily outperforms an award-winning "60 minutes" correspondent." a 5-year-old boy in cape cod, massachusetts, faces a possible suspension from his after-school program. after building a gun out of legos. yes, legos. the boy's parents say the school is taking things too far and a little bit of reedestruction would have been enough. they point out again the boy is 5 years old. the principal of the elementary school told the affiliate fox 25, "while someone might think the making of a le go gun is the action of a 5-year-old, to other 5-year-olds that might be a scary experience." finally italian sources tell fox news that top obama guru
and our universities for the blind that we need here in america. not only the environment in which they can come here and study, but say here if they are needed. connell: making sure that it is not included in this deal, whatever that turns out to be? >> amnesty. there has to be a pathway to citizenship. people who follow the law should not be burdened by those that do not. connell: defined what that means . >> the 11 login or so have to be encouraged to come out of the shadows and join those already in line. there has to be an incentive for them to do that. it has to be negotiated. that is what we are afraid of. we do not believe that 11 million should be granted citizenship to prevent those that have followed the rules from the pathway to citizenship that they followed. connell: last thing on the prediction of the politics on this before we let you go. you think this will be a hard-fought, year-long battle or do you think we will get something done really quick? >> it depends on whether or not they want to treat this like obamacare. no transparency. i think it will be very hard t
environment? we will ask national journal reporter coral davenport. we will be right back. >> ♪ ♪ [video clip] >> we have created a platform that we call a digital feedback system. a main component of the platform are an integral sensors that turns on when it's all it-- when you swallow it. it collects information about the medicines that you take and your heart rate and body rate and temperature. a wellness matrix. then it communicates via radio with a cell phone that you carry. they process the data and send it back to you as an application that can help you manage your health. >> we are at a point where we have had all these incremental and amazing changes over the last five years. now we are poised to really make some great leaps in complex diseases. our understanding of cancer in the last five years has forced the last 25. the next 10 years will really take us through some amazing advances. >> the latest advances in health technology from the international consumer electronics show. tonight at 8:00 eastern on c- span2. >> want can count the times that americans say we are the best countr
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
are not the people with political power. but if you have an environment in which business is hesitant to relocate headquarters in the city because of these issues, then you're going to get people's attention. that's a terrible thing to say, but that is simply the political reality. >> christie hefner, thank you so much. it's great to see you. >> always great to be here. >> reverend al, thank you as well. >> thank you. >>> still ahead, bill gates will be here on set. and coming up next, former vice president al gore joins us here in the studio. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. i obsessed about my weight my whole life. and then, weight watchers. i amazed myself. get used to it. introducing the new weight watchers 360 program. join for free
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
environment, with some any competing priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country, and not help a schoolboy -- not help us globally. >> i have a lot of specific thoughts on it. the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides that you are expressing concern about. and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. if you want to do business and do it well in america, you have to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. in massachusetts, the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i cannot emphasize that strongly enough. the market that made america rich -- richer -- we have always been reached -- but the market them it is richer in the 1990's was the technology market. it was a $1 trillion market with 1 billion us
environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and in a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do inside of the department and with our partners and of the dod and the intelligence community to constantly be taking that information and make sure it does get to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepipe or stalled but that it does rise to decision makers and i am committed to improving every way that i can with the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict that we are going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats not just to the government is devotees that private sector facilities in to nisha although we protected our embassy and our school was badly damaged so we have to take a broad view and i think it is a start but it's not the whole story. >> mr. grayson from florida. 63 mr. chairman and secretary clinton for your contributions to securing america's place in the world for the past four years and for your contributions towards world peace. the first question i
environment. the investigation isn't over, so they don't want to name names or come out with the specific charges at this point, anderson. >> can you explain why security at this club would not let people get out of the one exit that existed? >> well, anderson, we talked today -- we actually heard the very harrowing story of this 19-year-old high school student who was inside. she got crammed up against the metal barrier. someone was saving her, a man she didn't know grabbed her and was pulling her toward the door. and she said she actually saw the doors shutting in their faces. she said she saw the light at the end of the tunnel, then all of a sudden the light would shut off because the guards were shutting the door in her face. and she said they hadn't realized that there was a fire. and they did only shut it for a couple of minutes, but in those few minutes it filled with smoke so much that when the door opened again there were already bodies lying on the floor, people shouting. she said, in fact, other security guards who were inside died, anderson. >> and the reason they wouldn't let
an environment in which they succeed. this is something that only the president and congress can do. states can't do it. in our country, you have to become an american to become a citizen. we have to have a system of legal immigration. >> let's go to guns. the one bill that seems to have -- there's two bills that have some bipartisan support. one has to do with gun tracking that your colleague republican mark kirk has signed on to with new york democrat kristin gillibrand. the other has to do with universal background checks. can you envision a way of supporting the universal background checks bill? >> chuck, i'm going to wait and see on all of these bills. i think video games is a bigger problem than guns because video games affect people. but the first amendment limits what we can doing about video games. the second amendment to the constitution limits wa we can do about guns. so the details matter to me. i'm going to be skeptical of any of these proposals and examine them in light of the second amendment to the constitution. >> so reading between the lines, you're more inclined to be support
environment is, apparently the national retail federation polled its members and found that none actually plan to add the fee. you've got, for example, toys r us and target. they told nbc news that they would not be passing that on to shoppers. >> profit margins are so skinny when we're talking about retail. >> right. >> let's move to this. the suffering could soon be over for fans of devil dogs, ring dings and yodels. >> reportedly mckee foods that makes little debbie snack cakes is reportedly offering $25 million to $30 million for hostess brand's drake's brands. the drake assets are apparently composed mostly of intellectual property and also some equipment. >> intellectual property? >> yeah. hostess also on friday won a judge's permission to place two other bread assets on the auction block. as part of this liquidation process, richard, hostess's various brands, the bread, ringdings, twinkies, they're all being auctioned off and hopefully sold off to lucky buyers. >> i think we just did this story because we wanted to say ring dings and yodels. >> i know. >>> add another two awards for "ar
certainly aware of the increasing threat environment. i not only was briefed on that, i testified to that effect. and there were constant evaluations going on. but no one, not the ambassador, security professionals, the intelligence community ever recommended closing that mission. and the reason they didn't was because the ongoing threat environment had up until the spring before our terrible attack in benghazi been a result of post-conflict conditions. that is something that we're familiar with all over the world. yes, there were some attacks, as you have said, but our evaluation of them and the recommendation by the security professionals was that those were all manageable because we had a lot of that around the world. i mean, there is a long list of attacks that have been foiled, assassination plots that have been prevented. so this is not some -- you know, one off event. this is considered in an atmosphere of a lot of threats and dangers. and at the end of the day, you know, there was a decision made that this would be evaluated but it would not be closed and, unfortunately, w
on the threat environment that the united states is in. for most of history we don't talk about this very much. we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can buy, so that we can not fight. it is a point i think that tom made which is important, it is i want to segue to fred, is to understand what it is that is involved in a military operation. fred has just finished a very important piece of work, i should a shorter longer, an interactive piece on the web that i know we be happy to share with folks that explains just what it is that we can do with particular numbers of troops we have as the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan but it's not just about warfighters and bureaucrats in d.c. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. fred, do want to talk about that and some of those ceramic decisions? >> sure. if we become very accustomed to throwing numbers of troops around and people of gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious, and the effect of that is that very few americans i think actually under
is a safety threat and it has environment concerns. the project was approved last month. so far the city is not responding to that lawsuit. >>> it's just turning over to 8:21. when it comes to the super bowl, you can bet on anything from beyonce's hair to players ending up in jail. a rundown of the more outrageous super bowl bets. >>> look outside, check out our weather. this is how we look outside, meteorologist mark tamayo will tell us about the warmer weather ahead as we get ready for super bowl sunday. >> good morning. traffic on 280 northbound. that looks pretty good getting up to highway 17. we'll tell you more about the trouble spots in the bay area. ao >>> 8:24. the city of new orleans is using the super bowl to show that it's recovering from hurricane katrina. thousands of reporters attended a super bowl media party last night. the gala included live music and performers on stilts. it was staged in a warehouse where mardi gras float floats are built. >> wonderful. the tourism and -- it just puts on a happy face for everybody. we're back, good to go, come visit us. wonderful. >>
, in a professional environment, they've got to think about themselves like a professional. and the other is don't worry about the paycheck. yes, my book is called all work, no pay, it's a joke, but if you're an unpaid intern you should only be working 12 to 15 hours per week at a structured, structured, safe environment, but if it's -- if you're choosing between a paid opportunity, and an unpaid opportunity, it's not about the paycheck, it's about the experience. which is going to be more beneficial for you and help you after you graduate. >> tucker: smart advice. >> ainsley: and a tip he she was clayton's intern at one time. see you're doing well. >> thank you. >> ainsley: and farmers selling products without a permit, but they are not going down without a fight. we'll explain. great segment. [ female announcer ] your smile. like other precious things that start off white, it yellows over time. fact is, when it comes to your smile, if you're not whitening, you're yellowing. crest 3d white whitestrips go below the enamel surface to whiten as well as $500 professional treatments, at a fraction o
. there should never, ever be a question about health and the safety and the environment that we put our men and women and their families in when we ask them to make sacrifices to serve this country, and i am committed to do that, and we will have further conversations. >> i know you have answered a number of questions about israel already today, but i do have one i want to ask you also. there is a special and historic bond between the u.s. and israel. and i am personally committed to israel's security and identity as a jewish state. when we met earlier i was pleased to hear you agree and also support a two-state solution and oppose any unilateral declaration of a palestinian state. we also discussed the need for a strong military and intelligence engagement between the u.s. and israel. >> just last fall i was in israel and i have spoken with senior military officials from both countries and i have continually heard the ties between our military and our intelligence organization has never been stronger. if confirmed, do you intend to maintain this close relationship and do you have any idea
more. you want to dress in layers and dress properly for the environment. >> is there a big difference in terms of elderly and young people in ways that tech really get sick and -- they can really get sick and suffer illness? >> definitely. older people have a decreased cold tolerance. they don't sense the cold as quickly as younger people do. plus they have other health concerns as well that affect their ability to be warm and to remain warm in cold climates. they also take a lot of medications which can decrease their ability to stay warm, so they're definitely a high risk category as well as infants. infants really can't tell you when they're cold, and they have a decreased ability to tolerate cold, cold temperatures, so it's important to check on both of those extremes. >> i know you brought some props in to show us what we can do to protect ourselves. >> i did. grandma already taught us this, but maintaining a good diet and staying healthy includes lots of fruits and vegetables. you need to drink a lot of water as well, and people say, oh, why do i need to drink water? your skin g
with little impact on the global climate. in the tight budget environment with the so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought in to limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy or country, and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing there. i dmont if you have specific thoughts? >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts. more than we have time for now. i'm not going abuse the privilege. ly say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy, and the opportunity of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you're expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues in this. you want to do business and do it well in america? we've got get to the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you massachusetts that the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy e fresh sei in -- efficiency in companies. they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i can'
. in that environment, women do not have an equal opportunity to survive or to help fellow soldiers survive. and there's 30 years of studies to back that up. as far as the issue of sexual assaults concerned, wow, that -- it's a huge problem, and it's getting worse. you don't make it better by transferring all the issues that involve sexual assault into those infantry battalions. in fact, when general dempsey suggested just the opposite, well, maybe this is the answer, no general, that will only make it worse, there's no reason to do that. and i'm concerned about what about the enlisted women. they don't want this. what about men who can't speak out about this. general dempsey also said if the standard's too high, we'll question why is the standard so high. that means that galley, incrementally standards will be lowered. they will be equal but lowered, and we won't have the same tough training for the infantry that we have now. >> so let me get back to your first initial comment there. are you saying that women are not as qualified as men? >> i didn't say qualified. they can serve and they are in the p
that and driving? >> sure. well, you know, we all -- a lot of us work in office environments, and he talks about mondays. today's a monday morning. it's raining here in virginia this morning. that sort of drudgery sometimes of going through the office. this character in the spot named dave has a different kind of take on life, and the transformative moment is the fact that he drives a vw. and when he exposes other people to that experience, it changes their disposition too. so that's really the turning point, if you will, in the spot. >> the ad cost $7.6 million to run it on super bowl sunday. it will be interesting. you have a question? >> i want to be a one person jamaican focus group here. i was born in jamaica. i was wondering, did you testt with any actual jamaicans? although i love you using jimmy cliff, a famous jamaican performer, the jamaican accent had a jar jar binks attitude. and anyone who saw "cool runnings" understands that. >> we talked to several jamaicans, and we had a speech coach to make sure it was authent authentic. we collaborated with jimmy on the spot. we took someone wh
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)